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Job's Praise

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

by Dr. Paul Chappell

"And there was a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house: And there came a messenger unto Job, and said, The oxen were plowing, and the asses feeding beside them: And the Sabeans fell upon them, and took them away; yea, they have slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee. While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The fire of God is fallen from heaven, and hath burned up the sheep, and the servants, and consumed them; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee. While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The Chaldeans made out three bands, and fell upon the camels, and have carried them away, yea, and slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee. While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, Thy sons and thy daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house: And, behold, there came a great wind from the wilderness, and smote the four corners of the house, and it fell upon the young men, and they are dead; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee."

Job 1:13-19

Your testimony during a trial will have a greater impact than your testimony during prosperity.

You can't mention the name Job without immediately thinking of suffering and trials. Job is God's example of a life of devastation and intense loss. Yet also in the name Job you have to think of gratefulness and praise.

Not much is told about Job's early life. From the beginning of Job 1, we see that God had blessed Job with many children, much wealth, large properties, much livestock, and overwhelming success. Yet among all that, the Bible describes Job as "perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil" (Job 1:1). Amidst all his sauccess, Job honored God.

One day Satan approached God and sought to prove that Job's righteousness was simply out of abundance. God allowed Satan to bring loss into Job's life as long as Job's life was preserved. Immediately after God allowed that, we read in verses 13-19 that the devil hit Job hard. His animals and servants were slaughtered, his fields were burned, and his children were killed. In the span of a few verses, Job lost everything.

How did Job react to such loss? How would you react in such a situation? While some people could rationalize becoming upset with God, questioning His goodness, and turning away from God, Job reacted in a humble, godly manner: "Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped, And said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither: the LORD gave, and the LORD hath taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD. In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly" (Job 1:20-22).

Job never once blamed God for what had happened. Not once did he sin against God in cursing Him for the trials he faced. He realized that he had nothing when he entered the world and he would have nothing when he eventually died.

The knee-jerk reaction of facing trials is asking "why?" We want an explanation as to why we have to face a difficult situation that others don't. Yet God wants us to view the trial as an opportunity to honor Him. God often works greatest during times of greatest pain.

Rather than asking "why," thank God that He has given you a unique opportunity to honor Him. Your testimony during a trial will have a greater impact than your testimony during prosperity. Thank God that He has allowed you to be such a witness!

Take time today to call out to God in praise specifically for your trial. Follow Job's lead and say, "Blessed be the name of the LORD."

To learn more about the ministries of Lancaster Baptist Church and Pastor Chappell, please visit lancasterbaptist.org, paulchappell.com, or follow him on twitter.

Daily Bible Reading
Jeremiah 46-47 |Hebrews 6